Sponsored By FNH USAPresented By SureFire
3-GUN NATION Sponsors & Contributors
Author
Message
BillyDoubleU
The only way to reform people is to kill them.
Military
Offline
Posts: 4153
Feedback: 100% (1)
Posted: 9/21/2011 10:21:04 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/12/2012 9:56:32 AM EST by BillyDoubleU]
To help and build up this forum I figured this would be a good question or open thread to have the pros or anyone contribute their dry fire practice routines.

What do you do when dry fire training?

Do you focus on anything in particular with each session?
Do you run through a set check list of sorts?

What makes you better when not putting live rounds down range?
The human body is the only machine that breaks down from lack of use
Current:
Pushups- 117,425
Pullups- 45,730
Dips- 31,593
FrankSymptoms
Veteran of the Third Battle of Tannhauser Gate.
Offline
Posts: 25079
Feedback: 100% (6)
Link To This Post
Posted: 9/22/2011 2:48:44 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/22/2011 6:00:12 AM EST by FrankSymptoms]
the point of dry fire practice is to train "muscle memory." Dry firing 'trains' the muscles of the entire body to shoot well.

DO focus on something far away, and see if it moves in your sights as you dry fire.

eta

Dry firing exercises.
My poetic license has been suspended.

Dammit. I failed the Turing test.

Their systems aren't too different from ours

No intelligent man has any respect for an unjust law.
uscbigdawg1
Offline
Posts: 1800
Feedback: 0% (0)
Link To This Post
Posted: 10/5/2011 1:39:45 PM EST
Pick up the two dry fire books published by Steve Anderson at Anderson Shooting. They are the bible for dry fire practice and Steve's results speak for themselves.

In addition, Matt Burkett has a section over at Predator Tactical where he's put up some dry fire drills as well as a target/drill simulator that you can use your firearm and your computer.

Rich
LaRue556
Agile...Versatile...Pro Deo et Patria
Offline
Posts: 7957
Feedback: 100% (11)
Link To This Post
Posted: 11/9/2011 6:34:14 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/9/2011 6:35:32 PM EST by LaRue556]
Thanks for this info....I had targets hung on my walls but really didn't know what I was doing. Made it up as I went.


The Predator Tactical one will be especially cool for people.
http://mwft.blogspot.com/ (Updated 0700 every Monday)
GeorgiaCarry.org Member
"But just as each person reacts differently from ingesting projectiles, i won't tie my TTP's onto what people *may* do. " - Pat Rogers
jukeboxx13
Offline
Posts: 585
Feedback: 100% (13)
Link To This Post
Posted: 4/15/2012 8:33:40 PM EST
Originally Posted By uscbigdawg1:
Pick up the two dry fire books published by Steve Anderson at Anderson Shooting. They are the bible for dry fire practice and Steve's results speak for themselves.

In addition, Matt Burkett has a section over at Predator Tactical where he's put up some dry fire drills as well as a target/drill simulator that you can use your firearm and your computer.

Rich


Thanks for the link for predatortactical.com. This is very useful
BillyDoubleU
The only way to reform people is to kill them.
Military
Offline
Posts: 7147
Feedback: 100% (1)
Link To This Post
Posted: 5/12/2012 9:55:29 AM EST
A good article from Center Mass.

I finally wrote up some dry fire routines and damn, it took a awhile. How long are your dry fire sessions?

http://centermassgroup.com/2012/05/good-shooter/


If you want to get good at shooting, there is only one-way to do it…Dry-Fire. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, it’s the “Secret to shooting like a Navy SEAL.” So many people these days’ want to take shortcuts to everything they do, hell, I’m one of them, but learning to shoot is one thing there’s no app for. The reason for practicing dry weapons manipulation (a.k.a “Dry-Fire) is to neurologically teach your body the correct movements you would like it to do while under stress (Muscle Memory). To do this you must SLOWLY go thru the correct movements EXACTLY how you want to do it when milliseconds will be the difference between life and death. You should NEVER try to go fast! Speed will come thru practicing smooth, deliberate, mistake-free movements. Remember, smooth is fast (but slow is just slow).
"But I've brought a big bat,
I'm all ready, you see.
Now my troubles are going
To have trouble with me!" Dr. Seuss
jtielke
Member
Offline
Posts: 680
Feedback: 100% (13)
Link To This Post
Posted: 5/14/2012 1:06:54 AM EST
I do most all of my practice dry fire as I don't have time to get out to the range as often as I'd like. Almost every single night I do the below routine.

Warm up - 5 minutes
Set of Shotgun, Pistol, and then Rifle drills - 20 minutes
Break
Redo set of Shotgun, Pistol, and Rifle drills - 20 minutes

I used to do 3 sets of the drills but was getting a lot of pain in my hands and elbows after a few years of that so I cut back.

Warm up is pistol only, striker/hammer reset after each shot. Work on trigger control just holding sight on target, then draws from several different starting positions as well as strong and weak hand. Focusing on making sure the front sight doesn't move throughout the trigger pull, grip consistency, speed, and sight alignment.

My sets of drills for pistol, shotgun, and rifle always cover a few basics but I will change them up if I've found something I need to work on or there's a unique skill required at an upcoming match. All drills you have to focus on gripping the gun the same way as if you had recoil, getting a proper sight picture, and calling your shots. If you start letting yourself get sloppy in dry fire with not calling your shots you aren't doing yourself any favors. It's easy to go fast when you don't have targets to show your score. All drills I immediately put the safety on when finished so that's second nature and I can quickly do it when abandoning a gun on a 3-Gun stage.

Shotgun I usually do the same thing but vary the start positions and direction I go. Start position pick up gun off table, low ready, or port arms, then shoot at 4 targets on the wall, reload 4 dummy shells while moving then four shots on the move. Each start position done twice going left to right then again right to left for 12 total runs. If I'm expecting some difficult slug shots I'll set the trigger and practice trigger control offhand 10 times.

Pistol is a little more complicated, I shoot USPSA production division so I have a good number of reloads in here. I have six targets on the wall, first I draw and fire one shot at each one, reload, repeat, reload, and repeat. Do that again going the opposite direction. That's for practicing transitions, getting your eyes to the next target quickly is more difficult when you have one shot on a bunch of targets. Next I do two shots on each of 3 targets, reload, same, reload, same and then do the drill again in the opposite direction. Do something similar next with strong and weak hand. After that I shoot 3 targets, reload while moving, and shoot the targets again on move. Then practice coming into and out of shooting boxes, being ready when stepping into box and setting up quickly. Start in one box, shoot at 3 targets, move to next box, shoot 3 targets, then starting moving forward while reengaging targets again. Drill starts are mixed from surrender facing uprange and downrange, hands at sides, loaded and unloaded table starts. Pistol magazines are weighted with dummy bullets.

Rifle I have 3 larger and 3 smaller targets. It's similar to shotgun that I do it from 3 start positions each twice from 2 directions for 12 runs total. The larger targets I put 2 on, smaller 1 making sure I slow down on them enough to have a good called shot, then I move to the next shooting position practicing getting the rifle up in position as I step in the box, repeat the same target sequence, and last start to move forward while reengaging the 3 large targets with 2 each. After that I go to 4 power, set the trigger and practice trigger control at some small dots I have on the wall. This is done last so I'm breathing a little heavy after all the running back and forth.