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 Can you eat alfalfa, wheat, oat, rye leaves, etc...?
Retro-man  [Member]
7/23/2007 5:00:24 PM EST
Since you can eat alfalfa sprouts, can you eat mature leaves?

How about wheat, oat, rye leaves?

Since livestock eat them and get fat it seems ok but I need confirmation.

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Waldo  [Moderator]
7/23/2007 5:26:30 PM EST

They call that hay and straw around here.
DanishM1Garand  [Member]
7/23/2007 5:29:29 PM EST
I don't think so. Our gut is not set up for it.
foxherb53  [Team Member]
7/23/2007 5:30:02 PM EST
The seed is the good part.
CSM  [Team Member]
7/23/2007 5:31:12 PM EST
Your stomach can't break down the complex carbohydrates and cellulose IIRC. You would get some nutrition, but not much energy out of it. Cows can, horses can to some extent.
Ops  [Member]
7/23/2007 5:38:39 PM EST
"Lambs eat oats, and does eat oats, and little lambs eat ivy..."

Ops
bassackwards  [Member]
7/24/2007 11:49:36 AM EST
alfalfa produces more protein per acre than any other crop. I think they eat it in the middle east. I believe the other crops can be eaten like lettuce and are also very high in protein.
FordGuy  [Team Member]
7/24/2007 1:06:43 PM EST
you'd expend more calories chewing it than you'd get with your puny human stomach. The protein in wheat is in the grain, or wheat "berry."
ranchhand  [Member]
7/24/2007 1:32:36 PM EST

Originally Posted By FordGuy:
you'd expend more calories chewing it than you'd get with your puny human stomach. The protein in wheat is in the grain, or wheat "berry."


Wheat leaves consistantly contain nearly 20% protein. It is very common to plant wheat solely for grazing. Ranchers who KNOW will no-till wheat into bermuda pastures for nearly year-round grazing

ETA: Wheatgrass is touted as a wonder food by alternative food weirdos so it must be safe to eat.
Retro-man  [Member]
8/5/2007 5:28:01 AM EST
OK, so you can eat the "hay". The stems are tough chewing though.
jp_72  [Member]
8/5/2007 5:34:37 AM EST
Ruminant animals have a multi-stage gut, regurgitate their cud and have specific enzymes in their digestive system to provide food from forage. In humans you would have roughage and not much else unless you were to allow for other means of improvement. The "fruits" of the vine are edible while the "vines" themselves are not.

That's as much as I remember from An Sci 101and biology class. Any ruminant nutritionists in class that could elucidate on my hypothesis!

Foxxz  [Team Member]
8/5/2007 5:40:31 AM EST
My horse sure likes it all

-Foxxz
Scottmkiv  [Member]
8/5/2007 2:32:27 PM EST
I agree, people wouldn't get much nutrition out of it. On the other hand, if you feed those things to cows/sheep/goats, you can turn hay into some mighty fine eating.
zeekh  [Member]
8/5/2007 3:20:37 PM EST

Originally Posted By Ops:
"Lambs eat oats, and does eat oats, and little lambs eat ivy..."

Ops


No No its
Mares ( Sp? horses ) eat oats and Does eat oats etc.
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